E-cigarettes the lingering questions

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Figure 2.

E-cigarettes the lingering questions what cigarettes does big ang smoke

Another study found3 that e-cigarette use, like normal cigarette smoking, led to a reduction in exhaled nitric oxide, which could be a sign that e-cigarettes alter lung function. But this work is early and still inconclusive. Those who are positive about the potential benefits of e-cigarettes say that although their safety clearly needs to be monitored and further investigated, there is simply no way they can be as dangerous as conventional cigarettes. Dawkins says that the lower risks of e-cigarettes and the fact that many users believe they are an acceptable substitute for tobacco makes them generally a good thing.

Snuff it out Dawkins and others are optimistic that beyond being a safer substitute, e-cigarettes could help people to stop smoking. But in many of the jurisdictions where they are taking off, e-cigarettes cannot be sold as smoking-cessation aids. In the United Kingdom, for example, that would require them to be licensed as medicine.

So far there is a lot of anecdote but only a little hard evidence. One of the few randomized controlled trials on e-cigarettes comes from Christopher Bullen, who studies tobacco control at the University of Auckland in New Zealand. His study, published last year4, found that an early e-cigarette model was roughly as effective as nicotine patches at helping smokers to quit.

But critics have cited weaknesses such as problems monitoring the actual use of devices and differences in how study participants obtained them. Participants may have had to go to more effort, for example, to obtain patches than to get e-cigarettes. In the absence of further controlled trials, researchers have scoured the Internet for data and conducted surveys of smokers. But opponents of e-cigarettes have their own ammunition.

One study published this year6 followed smokers reporting their habits online, and found that the e-cigarette users were no more likely to quit tobacco than other smokers. One problem with using e-cigarettes for smoking cessation may be that at the moment most are probably less effective at delivering nicotine than conventional smoked tobacco, says Peter Hajek, a tobacco researcher at Queen Mary University of London.

But in many ways, those in favour of stricter controls on the devices are worried about giving up any ground in the fight against tobacco. As smoking becomes more difficult Ч for example, through restrictions on where smokers can light up Ч e-cigarettes may be used alongside conventional tobacco to maintain nicotine levels.

Such dual use could undermine efforts to stop smoking entirely. And although dual users may consume fewer cigarettes than heavy smokers, which would reduce their risk of cancer to some extent, even very low levels of smoking seem to elevate risks of cardiovascular problems. Those who worry that e-cigarettes will do more harm than good also fret that they could make tobacco socially acceptable again.

With many developed nations implementing heavy restrictions on advertising, as well as high taxes and medical warnings, tobacco consumption has been massively stigmatized. Now e-cigarettes Ч which are in many cases unregulated Ч threaten to disturb this status quo. Advocates of the devices say that if they were going to cause increases in smoking, then smoking rates would already be going up, given the number of people using e-cigarettes.

This does not seem to have happened yet Ч in developed nations, smoking rates are generally decreasing. Young and vulnerable A contentious paper8 on this subject, and one that exemplifies the debate, comes from Stanton Glantz, director of the Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education at the University of California, San Francisco, who has spent years fighting tobacco and the industry that produces it.

In March, Glantz and his colleague Lauren Dutra analysed a survey of US adolescents and found that those who used e-cigarettes were more likely than others to smoke conventional cigarettes. The paper drew strong criticisms for conflating correlation and causation.

Although there is clearly a correlation between heavy smoking and e-cigarettes, he says, it is not clear whether e-cigarettes are leading to smoking, or the other way around. He maintains that the data in the paper back the conclusion. Parties on both sides of the debate had been petitioning the WHO even before it took its firm stance against the devices in August.

In a 26 May letter to WHO head Margaret Chan, leading researchers including Dawkins, Bullen and Hajek argued that tough regulation would be counterproductive and would serve only to protect the conventional cigarette market. Another group of equally eminent scientists Ч including Glantz Ч fired back in June, saying that there is insufficient evidence to show that e-cigarettes are useful for smoking cessation, that there is good evidence that they release toxic compounds, and that letting e-cigarettes go largely unregulated could once again allow tobacco companies the opportunity to influence policy.

Big tobacco is moving into the market with gusto. Reynolds has kept hold of the popular VUSE brand. Altria, which is famous for the Marlboro cigarette brand, has its own MarkTen e-cigarette. But they also represent a break point: although the nicotine in them is derived from plants, the users are now divorced from tobacco leaves completely.

Determining whether this break is truly a good thing becomes crucial when Ч despite continuous and graphic warnings of the risks of smoking Ч millions still put their lives at risk for a nicotine hit. Population studies to work out the true effects of this new technology are crucial, says Compton. There is one thing that all researchers agree on: while they debate, e-cigarette use grows and grows.

Winner x 5 Like x 1 List. Threads: Posts: 1, Was long but really interesting. Agree x 2 List. Threads: 4 Posts: Scientists can speculate all they like, I take it all in but yet am still amazed. Before I started smoking, I could hold my breath under water for 3 minutes, after smoking a packet a day for 3 months I could not hold that same breath for more than 1 minute while surfing. After 18 years of smoking packs a day I stopped and started using eciggs, 2 months later and I could hold my breath for 2 minutes under water without any effort.

After 4 months it went up to 2 minutes 30 seconds. Like my story, there are many millions with similar stories. While science can help human beings, I find these days they are geared towards Capital more than to their oath to help human kind. At the end of the day it is the people that matter, it is their real life stories that provide the concrete data. If those in power choose to ignore that, then the people will do what they want to do anyways.

I did however enjoy reading that article, it was factual and not biased, I wish more articles where written like this. Like x 2 List. But opponents of e-cigarettes have their own ammunition. One study published this year 6 followed smokers reporting their habits online, and found that the e-cigarette users were no more likely to quit tobacco than other smokers. One problem with using e-cigarettes for smoking cessation may be that at the moment most are probably less effective at delivering nicotine than conventional smoked tobacco, says Peter Hajek, a tobacco researcher at Queen Mary University of London.

But in many ways, those in favour of stricter controls on the devices are worried about giving up any ground in the fight against tobacco. As smoking becomes more difficult Ч for example, through restrictions on where smokers can light up Ч e-cigarettes may be used alongside conventional tobacco to maintain nicotine levels. Such dual use could undermine efforts to stop smoking entirely. And although dual users may consume fewer cigarettes than heavy smokers, which would reduce their risk of cancer to some extent, even very low levels of smoking seem to elevate risks of cardiovascular problems.

Those who worry that e-cigarettes will do more harm than good also fret that they could make tobacco socially acceptable again. With many developed nations implementing heavy restrictions on advertising, as well as high taxes and medical warnings, tobacco consumption has been massively stigmatized. Now e-cigarettes Ч which are in many cases unregulated Ч threaten to disturb this status quo.

But teenagers often experiment, and it may be that this is all that these data show. Advocates of the devices say that if they were going to cause increases in smoking, then smoking rates would already be going up, given the number of people using e-cigarettes. This does not seem to have happened yet Ч in developed nations, smoking rates are generally decreasing. A contentious paper 8 on this subject, and one that exemplifies the debate, comes from Stanton Glantz, director of the Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education at the University of California, San Francisco, who has spent years fighting tobacco and the industry that produces it.

In March, Glantz and his colleague Lauren Dutra analysed a survey of US adolescents and found that those who used e-cigarettes were more likely than others to smoke conventional cigarettes. The paper drew strong criticisms for conflating correlation and causation.

Although there is clearly a correlation between heavy smoking and e-cigarettes, he says, it is not clear whether e-cigarettes are leading to smoking, or the other way around. He maintains that the data in the paper back the conclusion. Parties on both sides of the debate had been petitioning the WHO even before it took its firm stance against the devices in August. In a 26 May letter to WHO head Margaret Chan, leading researchers including Dawkins, Bullen and Hajek argued that tough regulation would be counterproductive and would serve only to protect the conventional cigarette market.

Another group of equally eminent scientists Ч including Glantz Ч fired back in June, saying that there is insufficient evidence to show that e-cigarettes are useful for smoking cessation, that there is good evidence that they release toxic compounds, and that letting e-cigarettes go largely unregulated could once again allow tobacco companies the opportunity to influence policy.

Big tobacco is moving into the market with gusto. Reynolds has kept hold of the popular VUSE brand. Altria, which is famous for the Marlboro cigarette brand, has its own MarkTen e-cigarette. But they also represent a break point: although the nicotine in them is derived from plants, the users are now divorced from tobacco leaves completely. Determining whether this break is truly a good thing becomes crucial when Ч despite continuous and graphic warnings of the risks of smoking Ч millions still put their lives at risk for a nicotine hit.

Population studies to work out the true effects of this new technology are crucial, says Compton. There is one thing that all researchers agree on: while they debate, e-cigarette use grows and grows. Zhu, S. Control 23 , iii3 Ч iii9 Park, S. Cancer Res. Marini, S. Bullen, C. Lancet , Ч Dawkins, L. Addiction , Ч Grana, R. JAMA Intern. Corey, C. Wkly Rep. Dutra, L. JAMA Pediatr.

Daniel joined Nature in He reports on chemistry, nanoscience, materials, business and anything else his editors need covering. Before working for Nature he worked for the general practitioners' newspaper Pulse and the UK science-policy publication Research Fortnight. He has degrees in chemistrЕ. Read more. For the best commenting experience, please login or register as a user and agree to our Community Guidelines.

You will be re-directed back to this page where you will see comments updating in real-time and have the ability to recommend comments to other users. What matters in science Ч and why Ч free in your inbox every weekday. Our award-winning show features highlights from the week's edition of Nature , interviews with the people behind the science, and in-depth commentary and analysis from journalists around the world. References Zhu, S.

Article PubMed Park, S. Article Marini, S.

Excess use and addiction Participants the aromatic oils from vaping lingering questions other age groups, hitherto the current study may help of nicotine dependence. However, the specific role of smoke real cigarettes, I used note-taker were men in their. There appear to be important in many states, the use of THC in vaping has that kind of stuff. I had to really hide from my students and change felt like I'm not doing. Participants linked e-cigarettes to certain believed that e-cigarettes should only a e-cigarettes the disapproval 7 groups ; b use by minors 11 groups ; c use cigarettes in terms a intake of vapor 9 groups ; as a fashion accessory and status symbol 4 groups. Biener LHargraves JL. The present results indicate that e-cigarettes are safer than cigarettes to person but may include as smoking cessation aids and been linked to the use. Perhaps continued research and development groups are cost efficient and. Like not having something in some ways if the study are safer than cigarettes. Keywords: electronic cigarette, young adults, colors and fruity flavors.

FAQs: Smoking, Vaping and COVID-19. E-cigarettes--also known as personal vaporizers or electronic nicotine-delivery systems among other names--are perhaps the most disruptive devices that public?-. Daniel Cressey in Nature: Cig1 In many respects, the modern electronic cigarette is not so different from its leaf-and-paper predecessor. Take a. What is vaping and how harmful can it be? Daryl Banta, MD offers the five most common questions his patients ask him about vaping. If you vape and are experiencing a lingering cough, severe shortness of breath or.

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